Where to dispose of asbestos waste in Manchester

Last Updated on 21st January 2020 by

Where to dispose of asbestos waste in Manchester

Are you wondering where to dispose of asbestos waste in Manchester?

Perhaps you have dismantled a shed or garage at home that contains asbestos cement, or you have been doing some home renovations involving removing asbestos.

Some examples of where asbestos cement bonded materials may be used in the home are on garage/shed roofs, on shed/garage wall panels, drain pipes, insulation boards, soffits, insulation panels, partitions and even bath side panels.

Asbestos is classed as hazardous waste and therefore must be disposed of in the correct manner.

It cannot be disposed of along with regular household waste.

Asbestos cement waste must firstly be double wrapped in heavy duty polythene sheets, bags or sacks, sealed securely and clearly labelled with the contents.

You can find more information and guidance on disposing of asbestos waste here on the HSE website.

It is recommended that the asbestos waste be transported in a trailer or even a van if possible so that it can be rinsed out afterwards with water.

You can take the asbestos waste and dispose of it at many different waste recycling centres within the Greater Manchester area that have a weighbridge.

You do not need a license to remove or dispose of any household asbestos cement.

However, any other asbestos containing materials must be removed by a licensed contractor who will have to pay to dispose of the asbestos waste.

Tradesmen or builders cannot take asbestos waste to a Manchester recycling centre, as it is against the law to dispose of it there and they will be prosecuted for doing so.

Instead, there are many private waste disposal companies that can come and collect the asbestos waste from residential or commercial premises and dispose of it at a licensed site/transfer station.

One local company that can do this for the trade are Wheeldon Brothers.

Waste Recycling centres in Manchester

However, if you’re not a tradesmen/builder and live in the Manchester area, and you need to dispose of your household asbestos cement waste, then you will need need to take it to one of the recycling centres in the following areas.¬† Click on the name of the site for full address and details :-

Sites that accept asbestos Opening times
Arkwright Street, Oldham Mon to Fri 7am to 6pm Sat to Sun 7am to 5pm
Longley Lane, Sharston Mon to Fri 7am to 6pm Sat to Sun 7am to 5pm
Cobden Street, SalfordMon to Sun 7am to 5pm
Bredbury Parkway, BredburyDue to essential maintenance, the entrance for vehicles over 2 metres at Bredbury Parkway is closed. It will reopen January 2020.

More details can be found here.


Duty holders and employers have a legal responsibility to manage asbestos in their building so as not to put employees at risk. Contact our Armco office for asbestos management and refurbishment/ demolition surveys on 0161 763 3727 or by visiting https://www.armco.org.uk/

Alternatively, for all your asbestos training needs call 0161 761 4424 or visit https://www.armcoasbestostraining.co.uk/for more information or to book a training course.

Duty holders and employers have a legal responsibility to manage asbestos in their properties, carrying out an asbestos survey in their buildings so as not to put employees at risk.

So make sure you contact our Armco office to arrange asbestos testing or an asbestos survey before it’s too late! 

Whether you need an asbestos management survey or a refurbishment/ demolition survey, contact us at 0161 763 3727 or by visiting https://www.armco.org.uk/

Finally, for all your asbestos training needs call 0161 761 4424 or visit https://www.armcoasbestostraining.co.uk/to book an asbestos awareness training course.

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Published Nov 29, 2016

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